Sunday, January 7, 2018

Global Food and Agriculture Photos January 7, 2018

This roundup of global food, farming, and agricultural photos appears every Sunday on Big Picture Agriculture.

U.S.A.
Embed from Getty Images

Longhorn steers are marched through downtown in the National Western Stockshow parade on January 4, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The parade is the traditional opening to the show now in its 112th year. Photo credit: Rick Wilking / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

A Mars bar split in two, as half the sugar consumed by children comes from unhealthy snacks and sugary drinks, according to a campaign that suggests parents look out for snacks of no more than 100 calories at a time, which is approximately half a Mars bar. Photo credit: Martin Keene / PA Images / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Honey infused with cannabis is displayed for sale at the MedMen marijuana dispensary in West Hollywood, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018. California launched legal marijuana Monday, and customers lined up to celebrate the historic moment in San Diego, Sacramento and Oakland -- some of the municipalities given the green light to start sales on January 1. Meantime, in Los Angeles and San Francisco, the state's first- and fourth-largest cities, customers were turned away empty handed. Photo credit: Patrick T. Fallon / Bloomberg / Getty Images.

MEXICO
Embed from Getty Images

People gather at the Zocalo square in Mexico City to get a piece of traditional 'Rosca de Reyes' (kings' cake) on Epiphany's eve on January 5, 2018. The giant cake was distributed among 200,000 people. Photo credit: ALFREDO ESTRELLA / Getty Images.

CANADA
Embed from Getty Images

Andreas Pfenning levels a crate of beets sorted by machine and the hands of Jamaican workers. Pfenning's Organic Farms in New Hamburg, Ontario, employs Canadians and Jamaican migrant farm workers to work its fields and packing warehouse. The owners would like to see its Jamaican workers afforded better pathways to becoming permanent residents and have open work permits that give workers the ability to easily change employers. Photo credit: Jim Rankin / Toronto Star / Getty Images.

E.U.
Embed from Getty Images

The Athens Bakers' Union and the Peristeri Municipality, making a basil pie for the Guinness World Records.The huge New Year's Dessert that was cut and distributed this afternoon in Peristeri, close to Athens, had a volume of 180 square meters and weighed about 2.5 tons. "Vassilopita", the special cake usually served at all households in Greece after midnight on New Year's day. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

People in central meat and fish market in Thessaloniki, Greeces economy expanded for a third straight quarter for the first time in more than a decade, providing a foundation for the countrys attempts to exit its bailout program next year , January 3, 2018. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Controversy for the mandatory payment of organic bags for fruit and vegetables, on January 04, 2018 in Rome, Italy. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Aldeas Infantiles SOS ONG deliver some of the 10,000 portions of a giant ring-shaped cake (locally known as roscon) during a charity event held in cooperation with the City Hall of the Spanish capital, on the eve of the Epiphany at the Puerta del Sol square in Madrid, Spain, 05 January 2018. The 'roscon' is a typical Spanish cake studded with frosted fruits and containing a little trinket or coin which is eaten on 'Reyes' (Epiphany) celebrated on 06 January. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Plastics and other detritus line the shore of the Thames Estuary on January 2, 2018 in Cliffe, Kent. Tons of plastic and other waste lines areas along the Thames Estuary shoreline, an important feeding ground for wading birds and other marine wildlife. According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), at current rates of pollution, there will likely be more plastic in the sea than fish by 2050. In December 2017 Britain joined the other 193 UN countries and signed up to a resolution to help eliminate marine litter and microplastics in the sea. It is estimated that about eight million metric tons of plastic find their way into the world's oceans every year. Once in the Ocean plastic can take hundreds of years to degrade, all the while breaking down into smaller and smaller 'microplastics,' which can be consumed by marine animals, and find their way into the human food chain. Photo credit: Dan Kitwood / Getty Images.

JAPAN
Embed from Getty Images

Frozen tuna are seen lined up in rows ahead of the new year's first auction at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo on January 5, 2018. Tokyo's world-famous Tsukiji fish market held its last pre-dawn New Year's auction on Janaury 5 before closing down for relocation, with the highest bidder paying more than $320,000 for a giant tuna. Photo credit: AFP / Kazuhiro NOGI / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

People browse food on sale at a stall in Ameya Yokocho market on January 4, 2018 in Tokyo, Japan. Ameya Yokocho, claimed to be Tokyo's last remaining open air market, started out as a black market after WWII when American goods were sold there. It now has around 500 shops along a long, narrow lane and is visited by tens of thousands of people daily. Photo credit: Carl Court / Getty Images.

SOMALIA
Embed from Getty Images

A Somali fisherman carries sailfish on his head to the Hamarweyne fish market near the port in Mogadishu, Somalia, on January, 5, 2018. Photo credit: AFP / Mohamed ABDIWAHAB / Getty Images.

ALBANIA
Embed from Getty Images

Olive harvest near Saranda, Albania on December 31, 2017. Photo credit: Oleksandr Rupeta / NurPhoto / Getty Images.

INDIA
Embed from Getty Images

Indian vendors sell cauliflowers at a wholesale vegetable market on the outskirts of Amritsar on January 3, 2018. Photo credit: AFP / NARINDER NANU / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Ghulam Muhammad Bhat makes cotton candy or candy floss on his his typical machine, inside his home, on January 2, 2018, in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian administered Kashmir, India. Ghulam Muhammad Bhat, who belongs to Srinagar citys Chattabal area, has for over four decades kept alive the tradition of making and selling candy floss in the old city, but he may be the last of his ilk. Bhat, who never married, has a speech impediment but is able to communicate well with children, who form his clientele. Children eagerly await the clinking of the brass bell which Bhat uses to announce his arrival in the narrow lanes and alleys of the city. Every day, Bhat, 65, prepares the candy floss at his living room, which doubles up as his manufacturing unit. His relatives say that he enjoys his work and walks several kilometers daily to reach his little customers. Bhats nephew Muhammad Ishaq, with whom he shares the house, said his uncle was probably the only person left in the city who made the candy floss locally. He said his uncle sells the candy floss in a traditional cubical glass-fitted box unlike others. Bhat got interested in making candy floss at an early age and learnt the process from a person who operated from somewhere near the area. Bhat welcomes us in his room which is choc-a-bloc with things of daily use. He explains to us how candy floss is made and points towards sugar, the main ingredient in candy floss, and then at the traces of colour that are poured through a slot in the middle of a spinning drum, which is run by a hand-driven paddle. A spirit lamp at the base of the slot melts the sugar and with the outward spin, hundreds of thin strands are generated through small openings, which once collected, form the candy floss. Years of making candy floss has made Bhat adept at his work. He collects each ball of candy floss and places them separately in his glass box. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.
Embed from Getty Images

Kashmiri men thrash the water with oars to separate chestnut from the mud and weed, on January 05, 2018 in Kolhom, north of Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian Administered Kashmir, India. Water chestnuts are a major crop for people living near Wular lake, Asia's second largest freshwater lake. Wular, looks more like a flat marshy plain than a large lake in winters, as the water level recedes and the entire families collect and extract the marble-sized fruit from its spiky casing. The sun-dried chestnuts are later sold in markets, particularly in summer capital city Srinagar, and are consumed raw or roasted and even ground into a flour which locals say has medicinal properties. Now it is also in demand for its anti-diabetic properties, and is used by diabetic patients, because it is free of both cholesterol and fat. Some researchers are even investigating whether the fruit has cancer-fighting properties. Six kilograms of the processed stuff, dealers said, is sold at $4.74 (300 INR), and rates go up as the winter progresses. The shells of the chestnuts do not go to waste and are used as cooking fuel. The women take care to store them separately, to later use them as fuel in kangris, an earthenware container with an outer encasement of wickerwork, filled with burning coal and normally carried under the clothing for heat in winter months. Photo credit: Yawar Nazir / Getty Images.

TURKEY
Embed from Getty Images

A man selling (Alkestnh), a famous meal in Turkey in Istiklal Street last night in 2017. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.

CHINA
Embed from Getty Images

A diameter of 12m huge 'dinner table' full with vegetable and grains was put in monkey mountain and attracts thousands of macaques came to welcome the new year on 31th December 2017 in Jiyuan, Henan, China. Photo credit: TPG / Getty Images.

No comments:

Post a Comment