Sunday, February 12, 2017

Global Food and Agriculture Photos February 12, 2017

This roundup of global food, farming, and agricultural photos appears every Sunday on Big Picture Agriculture.


The damaged leaves of corn plants caused by an infestation of fall armyworms, also known as Spodoptera frugiperda, stand on a farm north of Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017. The fall armyworms that have ravaged corn fields from Ghana to South Africa since arriving on the continent last year could spread to Asia and the Mediterranean, a research body said. Photo credit: Waldo Swiegers / Bloomberg / Getty Images

This picture taken on February 4, 2017 shows farmers removing plastic covers used to protect young rice plants from cool weather on the outskirts of Hanoi. As the weather gets warmer, the plants are ready to transplanted into rice fields. Photo credit: AFP / HOANG DINH Nam / Getty Images.

Picture shows a lettuce field devastated by storms in Torre Pacheco on February 8, 2017. Lettuce covered with mud, rotten leaves, harvest turned upside down by inclement weather: farmers in southeastern Spain, who usually provide Europe with salads during winter, look glum and do not foresee any quick improvement. Photo credit: AFP / JOSE Jordan / Getty Images.

Veterinary physicians vaccinate domestic fowl against avian flu in the village of Chaltyr as part of the annual planned prophylaxis. Photo credit: Valery Matytsin / TASS / Getty Images.

Salad is presented on a floating grow platform at the booth of 'Dry Hydroponics' during the opening day of the 'Fruit Logistica' trade fair in Berlin on February 8, 2017. The fair on the fresh food produce business and the latest innovations, products and services in the international supply chain is running until February 10, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / Tobias SCHWARZ / Getty Images.

Lemoncherry tomatoes are pictured at a stand in the opening day of the 'Fruit Logistica' trade fair in Berlin, Germany on February 8, 2017. The fair is dedicated to products, new technologies and services in the international fruit and vegetable business and will run until February 10, 2017. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.

Oxheart tomatoes are pictured at a stand in the opening day of the 'Fruit Logistica' trade fair in Berlin, Germany on February 8, 2017. The fair is dedicated to products, new technologies and services in the international fruit and vegetable business and will run until February 10, 2017. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.

Plants under LED grow lights are pictured at a stand in the opening day of the 'Fruit Logistica' trade fair in Berlin, Germany on February 8, 2017. The fair is dedicated to products, new technologies and services in the international fruit and vegetable business and will run until February 10, 2017. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.

Lychees are on display during the opening day of the 'Fruit Logistica' trade fair in Berlin on February 8, 2017. The fair on the fresh food produce business and the latest innovations, products and services in the international supply chain is running until February 10, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / Tobias SCHWARZ / Getty Images.

A Pakistani labourer sorts onions in a field at Sehwan in the district of Jamshoro some 285 kms from Karachi on February 10, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / ASIF Hassan / Getty Images.

Men talking at Bayern-Genetik's stand at the 2017 AgroFarm all-Russian livestock husbandry exhibition at the VDNKh exhibition centre. Photo credit: Artyom Geodakyan / TASS / Getty Images.

Angler catches a salmon during the opening of the salmon fishing season on the River Spey in Aberlour, Speyside, northeast Scotland, on February 11, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / Andy Buchanan / Getty Images.

Indian tea garden workers protest at Simulbarie Tea Garden, on the outskirts of Siliguri, on February 11, 2017. The management of the tea estate has announced suspension of work, alleging that a section of workers along with 'land mafias' is preventing it from planting tea saplings on unused land. Photo credit: AFP / DIPTENDU Dutta / Getty Images.

On February 10, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church celebrates the day of St. Haralambos the Martyr, who is also worshipped as patron of all beekeepers, gardeners and fruit-growers. The faithful light candles with jars of honey during a holy mass for the "sanctification of honey" at the "Presentation of the Blessed Virgin" cathedral church in the town of Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria. Honey is consecrated and then all the bread is coated with it. The rest of the honey is kept in the house as a remedy. Photo credit: NurPhoto / Getty Images.

Bangladeshi farmer collects rose from their field during flower harvest at Birulia, in Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. In 250 hectors land, around 90 percent farmers in Birulia are involved with flower cultivation. The farmers sell each bundles of rose that carry 300 flowers at 1000 BTD. Photo credit: Corbis News / Sk Hasan Ali / Getty Images.

Agriculture specialists from the US Customs and Border Protection inspect a shipment of flower stems on February 8, 2017 at the Miami airport, to keep pests and plant diseases from entering the US and harm local agriculture. In the span of two to three weeks ahead of Valentine's day, airport authorities expect to receive more than 500 million stems to be distributed all over the country. Photo credit: AFP / Leila MACOR / Getty Images.

French oyster farmer Christophe Guinot shows heart shaped oysters that he produces and sells on Saint Valentine's Day, in Leucate, on February 9, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / RAYMOND Roig / Getty Images.

A model walks the runway at Salon Du Chocolat 2017 on February 9, 2017 in Milan, Italy. Photo credit: Vincenzo Lombardo / Getty Images.

A picture taken on February 10, 2017 shows chocolate creations in the shape of hearts displayed on the opening day of the Brussels Chocolate Fair in the Belgian capital, Brussels. The event runs until February 13, 2017. Photo credit: AFP / EMMANUEL DUNAND / Getty Images.

2 comments:

  1. Photo collection of food and agriculture are very good, the leaf maize on first picture is not so good because insect eat, and damaged all farmers lose the production.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, indeed, the army worms are bad news for farmers.

    ReplyDelete