Thursday, December 15, 2016

Omaha, Nebraska Stockyards Photos 1938


Note that as a little girl, I got to shop in Omaha at stores like Brandeis, Goldstein Chapman’s, Penney's, Sears and Bishops Buffet with my mother while my father spent time at the Omaha Stockyards. I remember being in the big stockyards building a few times which was a rather large experience for a farm child. Now, all of this Omaha history is gone, both the downtown shopping stores and the stockyards.--k.m.

From wikipedia:
Omaha overtook Chicago as the nation's largest livestock market and meat packing industry center in 1955, a title which it held onto until 1971. The 116-year-old institution closed in 1999.



South Omaha Stockyards.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.



South Omaha Stockyards.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.



South Omaha Stockyards.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.



Sheep entering the stockyards. South Omaha, Nebraska.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.



South Omaha Stockyards.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.



Cattle. Stockyards at south Omaha, Nebraska.
Vachon, John, 1914-1975, photographer. November 1938.
Farm Security Administration. Library of Congress.

Every Thursday a carefully selected old agricultural photo is featured here on Big Picture Agriculture — lest we forget how things used to be.

7 comments:

  1. I remember the smell of those yards oh too well. Grandpa always said, "smells like money."

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    Replies
    1. Yes, that was a commonly heard phrase.

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  2. Yup, that smell.

    I graduated from Papillion in '71 and South O'(Omaha)was the part of Omaha that you had to go through to get to the east side of Omaha.

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    1. Ha. I had a friend from Ralston and the Czech and Italian neighborhoods, too.

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  3. That must have been an impressive place. I assume they were brought in by rail and slaughtered pretty soon afterwards. Were there several slaughterhouses close by?

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    Replies
    1. They actually owned their own railroad. It was their cars, their equipment, their tracks. I do not know where the slaughterhouses were but I presume they must have been close by.

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    2. I believe Wikipedia has a page on South Omaha Stockyards that includes slaughterhouse history.

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