Wednesday, October 7, 2015

A Personal Note with Tomato Bragging Rights


Friends,
I haven't made a personal note, perhaps, since transitioning to this site, Old Farm Photos, from my previous site, Big Picture Agriculture. Though some investor followers have left (I guess they don't see the value in photos though they should) many readers have stayed with me and I'm grateful for that. Thanks. I'm also grateful for those commenters who made me decide  -at the final hour last April- to continue this online presence prior to shutting down the former site. I'm really enjoying doing this one, as it is all play and no work for the most part. I happen to think that, like Big Picture Agriculture, there isn't another site like this one online, so help me spread the word. I also think that my right sidebar of news feeds is extremely valuable as a resource and if more people knew about it, they would gladly use it, so also help spread the word about that.

If you're a gardener you know how much your produce excites you, and at our house this year, for the first year since moving to Colorado eight years ago, we have an abundance of perfect, large, beautiful tomatoes. The photo above is yesterday's harvest. I used them to make a pot of scratch chili last night accompanied with fresh herb bread using flat leafed chives, thyme, and dill from the garden. We've had a millennial return to live at home while working on his new goal, so I can cook away, once again.

And lest you think I'm staying out of trouble with my keyboard, I'm not. I've taken an active part in a local issue and our November elections that I think is very important to my community. It has been interesting, because it doesn't take a lot of paying attention and blogging, when soon you find yourself on the front page of the newspaper, quoted here and there, and the like. It helps me to realize that perhaps I was having a greater impact from writing about agriculture on a national and global level than I realized.

Hope you are all well, my readers. I'm always happy to receive feedback, or hear what is growing in your own garden, or which news items or photos interest you!
Kay M.

8 comments:

  1. This old commodity broker would just wither away without your site....thanks again.

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  2. Ha. Glad to hear it's keeping someone else alive besides myself.

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  3. I liked Big Picture Agriculture and I like this site. Glad you are enjoying life.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by and good to get your nice note, Lee.

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  4. I agree, good site. I was traveling (for the first time ever, after years of gardening) so my crops this year were the cucumbers along the front porch, planted the day before I left (turns out the extra shade kept them going for a couple extra weeks, best harvest I've had in this house) and the turnip greens planted in August. We had quite a few batches of young greens-though neither college daughter eats them-and now the ducks are grazing in the patch, but I may yet get a few turnips. It's all about doing what fits with your life!
    Another Lee :)

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  5. Like you, we had a bumper crop of tomatoes this year. In my case, this has led to a serious oversupply situation! I realize now that 30 tomato plants is too many for us. The larder is full to the brim with frozen salsa, tomato sauce, tomato relish, and diced tomatoes. Ate more BLT's this year than ever and made a couple big batches of vegetarian chili. A friend loaned me a cookbook called "Red & Green Tomato Cookbook" (1952) which has helped a little.

    And how do I ignore the dozens of tomatoes still ripening on the vine? [Sigh ... ]
    DB

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    1. DB, Well, it's a nice problem to have, isn't it? My fastest way to rid of tomatoes is to make gazpacho every day: tomatoes, olive oil, rice vinegar, touch of sugar, salt and pepper, one pepper, 3 garlic cloves, 1/2 cucumber, a slice of bread, water = blenderize = Food for the Gods!

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